educating: thinking

  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home2/askyourf/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 895.
 

Article link here. 

To the Editor:

I nodded while I read about the rejection of SAT and ACT scores by a commission of college admissions officials until I came to the part where “a new achievement test” was suggested to replace the SAT.

Any test, even one with the lofty goal of improving curriculum, means that schools and students will be focused on an exam, given on one day, for which someone will eventually develop an expensive test prep class.

As we move forward in education, we have to find new ways to help children and young adults think and create.

Who knows what students may need to accomplish in the future? Habits of mind, love of learning and maturity drive student success.

Kira Wizner
New York, Sept.22, 2008

The writer is a former New York City public school teacher.

 

To the Editor:

Re ''Study Links Drop in Test Scores to a Decline in Time Spent Reading'' (Arts pages, Nov. 19):

The decline in reading test scores after elementary school is no surprise. In elementary school there are fewer demands on students and more parent involvement.

Middle school students have independence, more access to the Internet and more homework to prepare them for high school. And once high school starts, it's all a race to college.

If we just let our children read without the book reports, the daily logs, even the mandatory journals, we would be creating happier readers who would read more.

Kira Wizner
New York, Nov. 19, 2007

 

To the Editor:

As a public school teacher (currently on maternity leave), I applaud Michael Winerip's article. In response to the idea that with small classes you can spot ''incompetent teachers'' faster and ''weed them out,'' I would like to suggest that teachers are more likely to succeed when they have fewer students.

With smaller classes, a middle-school teacher might teach 90 students a year rather than 130 or 140. A good seasoned teacher is challenged by a large class load, but the first year is critical for a new teacher. Learning your craft with 22 students in a room rather than 35 can make all the difference.

Small classes help create good teachers.

Kira Wizner
New York, May 26, 2004

 


 

Do you want to read some of the most interesting parent related articles published every day?

A breath of fresh air...

my bi-monthly 

Connected Parent email!

 

SIGN UP AND BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN a copy of the book YOUR BEST BIRTH.

And we will let you know what, where and when Kira is teaching & writing.  

We keep your email address to ourselves :-)

Askyourfriendkira Parenting Affirmations - Single - Kira Wizner 

Take 8 minutes to feel centered and reconnect with your parenting truth!  My original PARENTING AFFIRMATIONS are available, download them today.

See my listing on...